SSL Certificate

Student-Athlete Resources

A Four-Year Plan

Freshman Year

  1. Talk to your counselor about core class requirements.
  2. Get to know all the coaches in your sport.
  3. Work on your grades.
  4. Attend eagles skills camp, and/or other appropriate sports camps.
  5. Start thinking about academic and career goals.

Sophomore Year

  1. Keep your grades up.
  2. Talk with your coaches about your ability and ambitions.
  3. Keep a clean academic and disciplinary record.
  4. Make preliminary inquiries about possible colleges.
  5. Take the practice PSAT test in October.
  6. Attend another sports camp.

Junior Year

  1. Talk with your counselor about career goals and core course requirements.
  2. Talk with your coach about a realistic assessment of skills.
  3. Take your PSAT/ACT/SAT tests.
  4. Refine your list of possible colleges. Know their entrance requirements.
  5. Start making a sports resume.
  6. Send letter to college coaches.
  7. Register with the NCAA Eligibility Center, and have the school counseling department send your sixth semester transcript.
  8. Last chance for a sports camp.

Senior Year

  1. Make sure you have satisfied all graduation and core course requirements.
  2. Attend college and financial aid nights.
  3. Final chance for ACT/SAT and SAT subject test(s), if needed.
  4. Narrow your college choices to the appropriate number.
  5. Make sure your applications and transcripts are sent to colleges.
  6. Make sure NCAA rules for campus visits are known.
  7. Have your parents send in FAFSA in early January.
  8. Make copies of all forms for your records.
  9. List pros and cons of each prospective college.
  10. Let the coach know when their school is no longer in the running.
  11. Make your college decision based on a meaningful college education, career preparation, and a satisfying athletic experience.
  12. Update the NCAA Eligibility Center, by sending your final transcript.

Checklist

Use this checklist to track the tasks you need to perform to find the college that best fits you.

Pre-Season

  1. Meet with your counselor in January/February of your junior year to discuss plans.
  2. Take the ACT and/or SAT near the end of your junior year.
  3. Visit your counselor to discuss possible majors and careers.
  4. Visit your counselor to discuss senior year courses and NCAA eligibility.
  5. Review transcript yearly making sure compliance is met.
  6. Develop a list of colleges with your counselor.
  7. Visit several college campuses.

In-Season

  1. Apply to at least one college that will meet personal needs if sports is not possible.
  2. Maintain a good academic standing.
  3. If highly recruited, meet with your coach to discuss persistent recruiters.

Post-Season

  1. Meet with your coach to assess potential to play in college.
  2. Review the NCAA recruiting rules.
  3. Make college visits.
  4. Confirm that the right program of study is available at possible colleges.
  5. Meet with your counselor, coach, and parent to make a final decision.
  6. Discuss the proper application procedure with college coaches.

Differences between Divisions I, II, and III

Division I

Division I athletics have guidelines that help ensure academic success and fairness across member schools in the form of financial aid award rules. Each school must offer the minimum number of financial aid awards to student-athletes while being careful not to exceed the cap established to ensure fair competition.

For a particular school to be classified as a Division I member, it must meet a minimum number of sponsored sports for both men and women - seven for both men and women, or six for men, and eight for women. In addition, each Division I athletic program also requires a minimum participation commitment, varying by sport.

More specifically, for each sport, other than football and basketball, Division I schools must play a specified number of contests against Division I opponents with 50 percent of any additional games coming against Division I opponents as well. Men's and women's basketball teams must play all but two games against Division I teams, and men must play one-third of all their contests in the home arena.

Schools that have football are classified as Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) or NCAA Football Championship Subdivision (FCS). FBS football schools are usually fairly elaborate programs whose football teams must meet minimum attendance requirements (average 15,000 people in actual or paid attendance per home game), which must be met once in a rolling two-year period. FCS teams do not need to meet minimum attendance requirements.

Division II

The emphasis for your experience in Division II is a comprehensive program of learning and development in a personal setting. The Division II approach provides growth opportunities through academic achievement, learning in high-level competition and development of positive societal attitudes in service to community. The balance and integration of these different areas of learning opportunity provide Division II student-athletes with a path to graduation while cultivating a variety of skills and knowledge for life ahead.

Each Division II school has a maximum amount of financial aid awards for each sport that it must not exceed. Few Division II student-athletes receive full scholarships, so most of them pay for school through a combination of scholarship money, grants, student loans, and employment earnings. Division II sports are financed by the institution's budget like other academic departments on campus.

A Division II classification in athletics is also based on the number of sponsored sports for men and women. Each institution must sponsor at least five sports for men and five for women (or four for men and six for women), with two team sports for each gender. While traditional rivalries with regional institutions dominate schedules of many Division II athletics programs, football and basketball share contest and participation minimums and scheduling criteria, with 50 percent of their games against Division II or Division I FBS or Division I FCS opponents. Other sports, however, have no scheduling requirements and no Division II sports have any type of attendance requirements.

Division III

Division III athletic departments place special importance on the impact of sports on the participants rather than the spectators. Your experience is of paramount concern. Division III athletics encourages participation by maximizing the number and variety of athletic opportunities made available to you, placing primary emphasis on regional in-season and conference competition.

Institutions in Division III, as in other divisions, must participate in a minimum of sports. Division III schools are required to sponsor five sports for men and five for women, with minimum contest and participant levels for each sport. Additionally, every school must offer two team sports per gender, with both genders represented in each playing season.

Funding and financial aid functions differently in Division III than other division models. Each sport features student-athletes who receive no financial aid related to their athletic ability, and every athletic department is staffed and funded like any other department in that institution.


Monitoring Your Eligibility Center Progress

Obtain Needed Documents

  • Obtain your high school's list of NCAA-Approved Core Courses.
  • Get your high school transcript (from each school attended).

List Courses, Grades and Credits

  • Write the course title.
  • Write the grade.
  • Write the amount of credit earned.
  • Semester unit = .50; Year unit = 1.0

Do the Math

  • Determine quality points for each course.
  • A = 4; B = 3; C = 2; D = 1
  • Multiply the quality points by the amount of credit earned.
  • (A year's unit (1.0) grade of "A" equals 4.0 quality points.)
  • Pluses and minuses are not used

Calulate Your GPA

  • Calculate your core-course grade point average.
  • Divide the total amount of quality points by the number of core course units.
  • The Eligibility Center will do the final calculation from your final transcript.
  • 50 quality points and 16 core-courses 50/16 = 3.12 GPA.

Compare

  • Monitor status using the appropriate division standard.
  • If you are deficient, meet with counselor and plan to enroll in courses before graduation.
  • If you complete more than 16 core-courses, the 
    Eligibility Center will select the highest grades to calculate the GPA.

You can also access information from the NCAA Eligibility Center or by talking to your school counselor.

NCAA Scholarships by Sport

The following table lists the allowable number of scholarships for NCAA divisions I and II. This does not suggest that each college program offers the full amount of possible scholarships for each sport. That decision is governed by each school's sports budget and other factors. 

Sport
Division I
Division II

Baseball

11.7

9

Basketball

13

10

Fencing

4.5

4.5

Football

85

36

Golf

4.5

3.6

Ice Hockey

18

13.5

Lacrosse

12.6

10.8

Skiing

6.3

6.3

Soccer

9.9

9

Swimming

9.9

8.1

Tennis

4.5

4.5

Track & Field

12.6

12.6

Volleyball

4.5

4.5

Water Polo

4.5

4.5

Wrestling

9.9

9

Personal Stories

Here are two stories from past personal experiences related to college recruitment and scholarships: 

Probability of Competing in Athletics After High School

Student-
Athlete
Basketball
 Football
 Baseball
  Hockey
  Soccer

High School
Student
Athletes

538,676

1,086,627

474,791

35,198

410,982

High School
Senior
Student
Athletes

153,907

310,465

135,655

10,057

117,423

NCAA
Student
Athletes

17,984

70,147

32,450

3,964

23,365

NCAA
Freshman
Roster
Positions

5,138

20,042

9,271

1,133

6,676

NCAA Senior
Student
Athletes

3,996

15,588

7,211

881

5,192

NCAA
Student
Athletes
Drafted

46

254

678

7

101

Percent
High School
to NCAA

3.3%

6.5%

6.8%

11.3%

5.7%

Percent
NCAA to
Professional

1.2%

1.6%

9.4%

0.8%

1.9%

Percent
High School
to
Professional

0.03%

0.08%

0.50%

0.07%

0.09%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Note:
The percentages above are based on estimated data and should be considered approximations of the actual percentages. 
Last Updated: September 24, 2013

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Estimated Probability of Competing in Athletics

Beyond the High School Interscholastic Level
Updated: September 24, 2013

Men's Basketball
• Approximately one in 30, or approximately 3.3 percent, of high school senior boys playing
interscholastic basketball will go on to play men's basketball at a NCAA member institution.
• About one in 75, or approximately 1.2 percent, of NCAA male senior basketball players will get
drafted by a National Basketball Association (NBA) team.
• Three in 10,000, or approximately 0.03 percent of high school senior boys playing interscholastic
basketball will eventually be drafted by an NBA team.  
Football
• About 6.5 percent, or approximately one in 16, of all high school senior boys playing interscholastic
football will go on to play football at a NCAA member institution.
• Less than two in 100, or 1.6 percent, of NCAA senior football players will get drafted by a National
Football League (NFL) team.
• Eight in 10,000, or approximately 0.08 percent of high school senior boys playing interscholastic
football will eventually be drafted by an NFL team.
Baseball
• About five in 75, or about 6.8 percent, of high school senior boys interscholastic baseball players will
go on to play men's baseball at a NCAA member institution.
• About nine in 100, or about 9.4 percent, of NCAA senior male baseball players will get drafted by a
Major League Baseball (MLB) team.
• Approximately one in 200, or about 0.50 percent of high school senior boys playing interscholastic
baseball will eventually be drafted by an MLB team.
Men's Ice Hockey
• Approximately 11 in 100, or about 11.3 percent, of high school senior boys interscholastic ice
hockey players will go on to play men's ice hockey at a NCAA member institution.
• One in 125, or about .8 percent, of NCAA senior male ice hockey players will get drafted by a
National Hockey League (NHL) team.
• About one in 1,400, or approximately 0.07 percent of high school senior boys playing interscholastic
ice hockey will eventually be drafted by an NHL team.
Men's Soccer
• Less than three in 50, or about 5.7 percent, of high school senior boys interscholastic soccer players
will go on to play men's soccer at a NCAA member institution.
• Approximately 20 in 1,000, or about 1.9 percent, of NCAA senior male soccer players will be drafted
by a Major League Soccer (MLS) team.
• More than two in 2,000 or approximately 0.09 percent of high school senior boys playing
interscholastic soccer will eventually be drafted by an MLS team. 

Methodology
To calculate the estimated probability of competing in athletics beyond the high school interscholastic level, data from several sources were combined. First, the estimated number of high school student-athletes participating interscholastically in the sports having a major professional league in the United States was obtained from the National Federation of State High School Associations. To calculate the number of high school seniors participating interscholastically in those sports, the total number of high school student-athletes participating was divided by 3.5. This figure was used because some high schools are three-year high schools while others are four-year high schools. 

The estimated number of NCAA student-athletes competing in sports with major professional leagues in the United States was obtained from the NCAA's 1982-11 Participation Statistics Report. To estimate the number of NCAA roster positions in these sports available to an incoming freshmen class, the total number of NCAA student-athletes participating was divided by 3.5. This figure was used because current player attrition will leave more roster positions open than would be expected due to normal graduation. To estimate the number of NCAA senior student-athletes participating in those sports, the total number of NCAA student-athletes participating was divided by 4.5. This figure was used because student athletes participating in these sports often red shirt and therefore are on the team for five years. The number of college student-athletes drafted by major professional sport leagues in the United States was calculated using the most recent draft data for each league.

To calculate the probability of a high school senior going on to participate for a NCAA institution in these sports, the estimated number of open NCAA roster positions was divided by the estimated number of high school seniors participating interscholastically in these sports. To calculate the probability of a NCAA senior student-athlete being drafted by a professional team in these sports, the number of NCAA student-athletes drafted into these professional leagues was divided by the estimated number of NCAA senior student-athletes participating in these sports. To calculate the probability of a high school senior student-athlete eventually being drafted by a professional team in these sports, the number of NCAA senior student-athletes drafted by a United States professional league in these sports was divided by the estimated number of high school seniors participating interscholastically in these sports. All probabilities were multiplied by 100 to convert them to percentages.

Obviously, many assumptions and estimations are made in the process of calculating these figures. Therefore, the reader should not consider these figures to be exact, but instead should view these figures as educated calculations. 

Questions to Ask as You Consider College

You may want to ask prospective college coaches these questions as you consider colleges.

Athletics 

  1. What positions will I play on your team? It is not always obvious. Most coaches want to be flexible, so you might not receive a definite answer.
  2. What other players may be competing at the same position? The response should give you an idea of when you can expect to be a starter.
  3. Will I be redshirted my first year? The school's policy on redshirting may impact you both athletically and academically.
  4. What expectations do you have for training and conditioning? This will reveal the institution's commitment to a training and conditioning program.
  5. How would you best describe your coaching style? Every coach has a particular style that involves different motivational techniques and discipline. You need to know if a coach's teaching style matches your learning style.
  6. When does the head coach's contract end? How long does the coach intend to stay? The answer could be helpful. Do not make any assumptions about how long a coach will be at a school. If the coach leaves, does this change your mind about the school/program?
  7. What are preferred, invited, and uninvited walk-on situations? How many do you expect to compete? How many earn a scholarship? Situations vary from school to school.
  8. Who else are you recruiting for my position? Coaches may consider other student-athletes for every position.
  9. Is medical insurance required for my participation? Is it provided by the college? You may be required to provide proof of insurance.
  10. If I am seriously injured while competing, who is responsible for my medical expenses? Different colleges have different policies.
  11. What happens if I want to transfer to another school? You may not transfer without the permission of your current school's athletics administration. Ask how often coaches grant this privilege and ask for an example of a situation in which permission was not granted.
  12. What other factors should I consider when choosing a college? Be realistic about your athletics ability and the type of athletics experience you would enjoy. Some student-athletes want to be part of a particular athletics program, even if that means little or no playing time. Other considerations include coaching staff and style. Of course, the ideal is to choose a college or university that will provide you with both the educational and athletics opportunities you want.

Academics

  1. How good is the department in my major? How many students are in the department? What credentials do faculty members hold? What are graduates of the program doing after school?
  2. What percentage of players on scholarship graduate? The repsonse will suggest the school's commitment to academics. You might want to ask two follow-up questions: A. What percentage of incoming students eventually graduate? B. What is the current team's grade-point average?
  3. What academic support programs are available to student-athletes? Look for a college that will help you become a better student.
  4. If I have a diagnosed and documented disability, what kind of academic services are available? Special academic services may help you achieve your academic goals.
  5. How many credit hours should I take in season and out of season? It is important to determine how many credit hours are required for your degree and what pace you will follow to obtain that degree.
  6. Are there restrictions in scheduling classes around practice? NCAA rules prevent you from missing class for practice.
  7. Is summer school available? If I need to take summer school, will it be paid for by the college? You may need to take summer school to meet academic and/or graduation requirements.
College Life
  1. What is a typical day for a student-athlete? The answer will give you a good idea how much time is spent in class, practice, study, and travel. It will also give you a good indication of what coaches expect.
  2. What are the residence halls like? The response should give you a hint of how comfortable you would be in your room, in study areas, in community bathrooms, and at the laundry facilities. Also ask about the number of students in a room, co-ed dorms, and the rules governing life in the residence halls.
  3. Must student-athletes live on campus? If "yes," ask about exceptions.

Recruiting Rules: Divisions I, II and III

Summary of Recruiting Rules-Division I 

 
RECRUITING METHOD
MEN'S BASKETBALL
FOOTBALL
OTHER SPORTS 
 
 

 

 

 

 

 
S
O
P
H
O
M
O
R
E
 
 
  
  
Y
E
A
R

Recruiting materials

- You may receive brochures for camps and questionnaires.

- You may begin receiving recruiting materials June 15 after your sophomore year.

- You may receive brochures for camps and questionnaires.

- You may receive brochures for camps and questionnaires.

Telephone calls

- You may make calls to coach at your expense.

- College may accept collect calls from you at end of your sophomore year.

- College coach cannot call you.

- You may make calls to coach at your expense only.

- College coach cannot call you.

- You may make calls to coach at your expense only.

- College coach cannot call you.

- Women's Ice Hockey: If you are an international prospect, a college coach may call you once in July after sophomore year.

Off-campus contact

- None allowed.

- None allowed.

- None allowed.

Official visit

- None allowed.

- None allowed.

- None allowed.

Unofficial visit

- You may make an unlimited number of unofficial visits.

- You may make an unlimited number of unofficial visits.

- You may make an unlimited number of unofficial visits.

 

RECRUITING METHOD
MEN'S BASKETBALL
FOOTBALL
OTHER SPORTS
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

J
U
N
I
O
R
  
  
 
 
 
Y
E
A
R

Recruiting materials

- Allowed.

- You may begin receiving recruiting materials June 15 after your sophomore year.

- You may begin receiving September 1 of junior year.

- You may begin receiving September 1 of junior year.

- Men's Ice Hockey: You may begin receiving recruiting materials June 15 after your sophomore year.

Telephone calls

  

  

  

College coaches may call you

- You may make calls to the coach at your expense.

- Once per month beginning June 15, before your junior year, through July 31 after your junior year.

- You may make calls to the coach at your expense.

- Once from April 15 to May 31 of your junior year.

- You may make calls to the coach at your expense.

- Once per week starting July 1 after your junior year.

- Men's Ice Hockey: Once per month beginning June 15, before your junior year, through July 31 after your junior year.

Off-campus contact

- None allowed.

- None allowed.

- Allowed starting July 1 after your junior year.

- For gymnastics: allowed after July 15 after your junior year.

Official visit

- None allowed.

- None allowed.

- None allowed.

Unofficial visit

- You may make an unlimited number of unofficial visits.

- You may make an unlimited number of unofficial visits.

- You may make an unlimited number of unofficial visits.

 

 

RECRUITING METHOD
MEN'S BASKETBALL
FOOTBALL
OTHER SPORTS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

S
E
N
I
O
R
  
 

 

 
Y
E
A
R

Recruiting materials

- Allowed.

- Allowed.

- Allowed.

Telephone calls

 

 

 

 

College coaches may call you

- You may make calls to the coach at your expense.

- Twice per week beginning August 1.

- You may make calls to the coach at your expense.

- Once per week beginning September 1.

- You may make calls to the coach at your expense.

- Once per week beginning July 1.

- Men's Ice Hockey: Once per week beginning August 1.

Off-campus contact

- Allowed beginning September 9.

- Allowed beginning November 30.

- Allowed.

Official visit

- Allowed beginning opening day of classes your senior year.

- You are limited to one official visit per college up to a maximum of five official visits to Divisions I and II colleges.

- Allowed beginning opening day of classes your senior year.

- You are limited to one official visit per college up to a maximum of five official visits to Divisions I and II colleges.

- Allowed beginning opening day of classes your senior year.

- You are limited to one official visit per college up to a maximum of five official visits to Divisions I and II colleges.

Unofficial visit

- You may make an unlimited number of unofficial visits.

- You may make an unlimited number of unofficial visits.

- You may make an unlimited number of unofficial visits.

Evaluation and contacts

- Up to seven times during your senior year.

- Up to six times during your senior year.

- Up to seven times during your senior year.

How often can a coach see me or talk to me off the college's campus?

- A college coach may contact you or your parents/legal guardians not more than three times during your senior year.

- A college coach may contact you or your parents/legal guardians (including evaluating you off the college's campus), six times.

- One evaluation during September, October and November.

- A college coach may contact you or your parents/legal guardians not more than three times during your senior year.

Summary of Recruiting Rules-Divisions II and III

 

DIVISION II
DIVISION III

Recruiting materials

- A coach may begin sending you printed recruiting materials Sepember 1 of your junior year in high school.

- You may receive printed materials any time.

Telephone calls

- A college coach may call you once per week beginning June 15 between your junior and senior year.

- You may make calls to the coach at your expense.

- No limit on number of calls or when they can be made by the college coach.

- You may make calls to the coach at your expense.

Off-campus contact

- A college coach can have contact with you or your parents/legal guardians off the college's campus beginning June 15 after your junior year.

- A college coach is limited to three in-person contacts off campus.

- A college coach may begin to have contact with you and your parents/legal guardians off the college's campus after your junior year.

Unofficial visits

- You may make an unlimited number of unofficial visits any time.

- You may make an unlimited number of unofficial visits any time.

Official visits

- You may make official visits starting the opening day of classes your senior year.

- You may make only one official visit per college and up to a maximum of five official visits to Divisions I and II colleges.

- You may make official visits starting the opening day of classes your senior year.

- You may make only one official visit per college.

Sample Letter to Coach

Date

Mr. George Washington
Varsity_________ Coach
Athletic Department
Local University
1 Main Street
Local, Massachusetts  12345-6789

Dear Coach______________:

I am currently a junior at St. John's Preparatory School in Danvers, MA, where I have been a member of the __________ team for three years. I plan to continue playing __________ at the college level, and I am very interested in receiving information about your program.

I have included a resume [and our schedule] with this letter, and I will update you at the end of  [the current] [next year's] season. At your convenience, I would like to receive some literature about your university's undergraduate [business administration program], as well as information about your team and its scholarship opportunities.

Thank you for your consideration and I look forward to hearing from you.

Sincerely,

Tom Brady
100 Top Street
Suburbia, MA 98765-4321
(123)456-7980

Sample Resume

Tom Brady
100 Top Street
Suburbia, Massachusetts 98765-4321
(123)456-7890
e-mail


ACADEMIC INFORMATION
Junior at St. John's Preparatory School, Danvers, MA
Graduate in May 20__
PSAT: 54(cr) 56(m) 60(wr)
SAT: 560 (cr) 580(m) 630(wr [always list your highest scores]
[if strong list SAT subject tests or ACT scores]
GPA  3.25/4.0 cumulative after three years

PERSONAL INFORMATION
Age:  17 (D.O.B.  2/18/__)
Height: 6'1"
Weight: 170 Lbs.

ATHLETIC INFORMATION
MVP Freshman Team
Co-Captain Junior Varsity Team
Varsity Starter Junior and Senior Year State qualifier 20__
All Star Team for Suburbia MA. past six years
Traveling Team Suburbia MA. past four years
Peak Summer Team past two summers
Best Summer Camp past four summers

ATHLETIC HONORS AND AWARDS
Conference All Star in 20__
Suburbia Chronicle All Star Selection 20__
The Raymond Huntington Trophy - most improved player over four years

REFERENCES
[current coach]
[summer league coaches]

Timeline for College-Bound Student-Athletes

Students and parents must take the initiative and work on their own behalf. Your son's coaches and school counselors will support him in his efforts, but he must take the lead in seeking out the right college. Staying on top of all the information throughout the high school years makes it easier when the time comes to apply to colleges.

Freshman and Sophomore Years

  • Become familiar with the Core Courses as defined by the NCAA in the Guide for the College-Bound Student-Athlete; to visit this guide, please click here.
  • Enroll in a solid academic program.
  • Maintain at least a 2.0 grade point average out of 4.0 in core courses.
  • Talk to your coach about opportunities to increase your exposure in your sport.
  • Attend summer camps: for exposure - select camps at colleges that you may want to attend, to improve your skills, and to compare your current skills with others.
  • Keep records of your athletic achievements, start developing a resume of academic, athletic and extracurricular accomplishments.
  • Visit college web sites. View the team roster, noting how many athletes are in each grade level, physical characteristics, and location of their prior high school to see what parts of the country coaches are recruiting from. If applicable look at times or statistics in your events for the current members of their team.

Junior Year

  • Become familiar with Recruiting Regulations as outlined by the NCAA in the Guide for the College-Bound Student Athlete - you must look at this Guide each year because rules and regulations change frequently and it is THE ATHLETES' responsibility to become familiar with these rules and regulations.
  • Continue to do well in school while taking a strong academic program.
  • Register to take standardized testing in the spring: either the SAT or ACT meet with your school counselor to map out a testing schedule.
  • Be sure to send your scores to the NCAA - the code # is 9999.
  • Begin to establish a list of colleges with your school counselor.
  • Make unofficial visits to colleges.
  • Meet with your coach to go over your college list seeking their input on the appropriateness of this list based on your athletic abilities.
  • Discuss with your coach at this time their level of involvement in the process: what can they do to help you reach your goals? Do they have suggestions on camps, programs or showcases that would improve your chances to gain exposure to college coaches who would be looking for athletes with your abilities?
  • Update your resume.
  • Send a letter of introduction with your resume to colleges that your are interested in attending (check the college web site to get the names and e-mails for the current coaches).
  • Complete in a timely and accurate manner all questionnaires that you receive from college coaches.
  • For those playing team sports make arrangements to have access to game tapes.
  • Continue to attend camps, showcases or tournaments.
  • Keep a file on each college that you have contacted.
  • Visit college web sites observing team records and who their competitors are. Remember if you believe that you can play at a certain college then you should look at the rest of the colleges on their schedule.
  • Register with the NCAA Eligibility Center, by clicking here.
  • Obtain an unofficial copy of your transcript at the end of your junior year in order to make copies to distribute to college coaches. 

Senior Year

  • Review the most up to date version of the NCAA Guide for the College-Bound Student-Athlete.
  • Take a strong academic program for your senior year.
  • Assess with your counselor whether you should e-take the SAT or ACT test; check standardized testing requirements for each college specifically do you need to take SAT Subject Tests.
  • Gather applications from all your colleges; prepare your personal statement; request teacher recommendations.
  • Have your SAT and ACT scores sent officially from these companies directly to your colleges.
  • Complete all financial aid forms as quickly as possible - CSS Profile in the fall (only used by certain colleges) and the FAFSA as soon as possible, after January 1st.
  • Review college list with your school counselor to be sure that you have some academically safe colleges on your list.
  • Continue to contact college coaches that have expressed an interest in your potential to play at their college or university.
  • Update your athletic resume.
  • Be prompt in your response regarding college questionnaires and requests for additional information.

What Every Student-Athlete Should Know About College Recruiting

If you are a high school athlete who wants to play college-level sports, keep two priorities in order, they are:

  1. College First
  2. Sports Second

This is especially true when talking with recruiters. This way you can avoid situations that might leave you without a degree or even a team to play on.

To begin with, learn all you can about the rules governing recruitment before contacting college coaches or players. Depending on which level of competition you're considering, your relationship with a recruiter must abide by the rules set forth by the NCAA, NAIA, or NJCAA. Violating any of the regulations might result in your being barred from competition. Refer to the NCAA, NAIA, or NJCAA website for a list of rules each athlete should understand.

The NCAA Guide for the College-Bound Student-Athlete identifies areas that each athlete and parent should be aware of. Such as:

  1. Contact periods
  2. Campus visits
  3. Phone calls
  4. Evaluation periods
  5. Dead periods
  6. Letter of intent
  7. Early commitment/Regular commitment

A certain amount of self-disclosure and self-reflection is necessary both during the recruitment process and after. Asking yourself questions and searching for the answer often helps to identify the school that will fit you right. Such as:

  • If I could not play for some reason at this college, could I be happy here academically and socially?
  • Could I be happy at this college or accept playing without a scholarship?
  • Could I be happy here in a reduced playing role?
  • Would I be happy at this college if the present coach were to leave before I graduated?

In a meeting with a coach or assistant coach, asking questions is appropriate. In fact, it is appreciated very much by the coach as well. In a home visit by a coach, plan on an hour and a half to two hours. During that time the following questions could be asked:

  • Identify the role of the recruiter. Is he/she the head coach?
  • Keep your education foremost in mind by asking about academic programs that interest you. A good recruiter is as informed about college programs as an admissions officer. Ask specific questions about majors and courses in your field.
  • Know what level of competition this school competes in. Athletic scholarships available?
  • Ask for details about the scholarships. Are they for one year only? Are they renewable? Is this a full or partial scholarship?
  • How long is the scholarship good for? Four years? Five years? Summer school? (An institution can commit to a 5th year, but is not bound to do so).
  • Is tutoring/counseling available? Other services for the student-athletes? Academic probation?
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